Guide to Quitting Smoking

Many medical experts believe that quitting smoking may be the most important step that many smokers can take to improve and lengthen their lives. Smoking has been linked to various diseases such as lung cancer, emphysema, bronchitis and many more. Smoking cessation may help smokers avoid these conditions and prevent them from getting worse.

The Challenge

Although quitting smoking may have many healthful benefits for smokers willing to improve their quality of life, it is always a case of easier said than done. Smokers have to go through a lot in order to effectively stop a habit such as smoking. It does not necessarily depend on a person’s motivation. There are other things to consider such as nicotine dependence.

But when smoker realize what they have in store once they quit smoking, the motivation would bring them to try and give it a chance. A consolation for this motivation may be the effects of quitting smoking on their health, which can come just as quickly.

Effects of Quitting

There are different effects that smokers may experience once they start quitting. Just around 20 minutes after their last cigarette, they may experience a drop in heart rate and blood pressure. At around 12 hours or so, the carbon monoxide levels in the bloodstream revert back to normal.

Around three weeks to three months after quitting, smokers may then begin to experiences certain changes. Some of them include better lung function and an improvement in blood circulation. At around 9 months, former smokers better breathing as coughing and shortness of breath begin to diminish. Better lung function during this time may help reduce the risk of infection.

By the time former smokers enjoy one year of a smoke free lifestyle, they begin to decrease their risk of developing heart disease in almost half. Five years of living smoke free can further reduce one’s stroke risk. Just as the habit of not smoking lengthens, so does the benefits that it offers. Life improves and health problems begin to go away. All of that can happen if only a smoker tries his or her best to stop the habit.