Viagra for Women: Why It Does Not Exist

Arousal problems are a common problem among men and women, especially when they hit a certain age.

When this happens, men simply reach for bottle of Viagra and pop a pill. Women however, do not have that luxury.

Why isn’t there an equivalent of Viagra for women?

According to Jacqueline M. Thielen, MD, of the MayoClinic, this is because "generally, arousal problems in women can’t be treated with a pill."

Viagra is an oral medication that is taken to treat erectile dysfunction or the inability to sustain an erection long enough to have intercourse. It works by boosting the effects of nitric oxide, a chemical that relaxes the muscles in the blood vessels of the penis. This increases blood flow, allowing a man to have an erection in response to sexual stimulation.

For women however, it is a different matter. Viagra may work for some women who are experiencing a loss of sex function due to antidepressants. But for most women, just treating arousal problems may not get to the actual problem: the lack of sexual desire.

Factors that influence women’s sexual desire

There are many factors the affect a woman’s sexual desire:

  • The stresses of daily life reduce most women’s desire for sex.
  • The start or end of a relationship, or the major life changes such as menopause or pregnancy, may correspond with the highs and lows of women’s sexual desire.
  • Orgasm is elusive for some women; and this may cause concerns which may lead to a loss of interest in sex.
  • A woman’ sexual desire is often linked to her sense of intimacy with her partner, as well as a reaction to a current relationship, frustrations, and past experiences. Eventually, these psychological troubles can add to biological problems and vice versa.
  • Chronic medical conditions such as diabetes or multiple sclerosis can also affect a woman’s sexual desire and alter her sexual-response cycle. This may cause discomfort during intercourse. Infections such as yeast infection may also elicit the same effect. 

If you are experiencing a lack of sexual desire or are having problems with sexual function, see your doctor.

Your doctor may recommend hormones, creams, clitoral stimulating products or other treatments. But these products do not work for everyone. Your doctor may recommend seeing a sex therapist.

Source: WebMD